About the Journal

The European Journal of Entomology was founded in 1904 as a periodical of the Czech Entomological Society (under the title Acta Societatis Entomologicae Bohemiae). Since then it has made a long and varied way, including several title changes, from its beginnings as a local publication, with articles mainly in Czech, to its status today as a fairly well-established international entomological forum covered in the most important abstracting and indexing services (Web of Knowledge, BIOSIS, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, etc.).

This would be quite inconceivable without the help of our many collaborators. We are much indebted to all those who have been helpful in so many ways, especially in reviewing papers. Our thanks are due to the members of the Editorial Board, past and present, but also to numerous scientists with no particular connection to our journal, who nevertheless responded readily to our request to review a paper.

We would also like to make an open invitation to all potential contributors. We do our best to process submissions promptly, and to evaluate them strictly but fairly. There are no restrictions regarding the subject, author, geographic region, and so on, of any submission. All which fall within the broadest bounds of the field entomology (including Myriapoda, Chelicerata, and terrestrial Crustacea) are appropriate. Nevertheless, we prefer comprehensive analytic papers in which the insect is the main object of interest, not merely a testing tool. EJE wants to be an "author friendly" journal as far as our funds allow. We offer free PDF’s, no page charges for articles up to 20 printed pages, and for a very reasonable sum of money the authors may make their article freely available on our web pages.

The heteropteran Pyrrhocoris apterus, our cover insect, was introduced as a model species by European entomologists. It has now become a link between quite diverse entomological disciplines, and has played a part in some events of worldwide significance (beginning with the discovery of the juvenile hormone analogs). We believe that as such it is a faithful symbol of the European Journal of Entomology.