Eur. J. Entomol. 114: 267-274, 2017 | DOI: 10.14411/eje.2017.032

Mating advantage of short-winged over long-winged adult males in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae)

Lv-Quan ZHAO1, Huai-Lin CHAI2, Hong-Jun WU2, Dao-Hong ZHU2,*
1 Co-innovation Center for Sustainable Forestry in Southern China, College of Forestry, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing, China; e-mail: zhaolvquan80@163.com
2 Laboratory of Insect Behavior and Evolutionary Ecology, Central South University of Forestry and Technology, Changsha, China; e-mails: chaihuailin@163.com, wuling9802@aliyun.com, daohongzhu@yeah.net

The trade-off between flight capability and reproduction is well known in adult males of insects with wing dimorphism but the reproductive advantage of short-winged (SW) males over long-winged (LW) males appears to vary across insect taxa. In the present study, we determined the difference in the mating ability of SW and LW males of Velarifictorus ornatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) in order to evaluate whether the SW male morph has a reproductive advantage. We found that the choice of a mate depended on the female. Compared with LW males, SW males had an obvious mating advantage when both SW and LW males courted females simultaneously, and that dealation significantly enhanced the mating ability of LW males. Losing the ability to produce songs reduced the mating advantage of SW males, thereby indicating that the greater mating advantage of SW males was related to the attractiveness of the song. In addition, the difference in the mating ability of LW and SW males was not related to body size or age. These results indicate that SW males of V. ornatus have a mating advantage over their LW counterparts because their underdeveloped flight muscles allow them to devote more resources to reproduction.

Keywords: Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Velarifictorus ornatus, mating competition, sing song, trade-off, wing polymorphism

Received: February 14, 2017; Accepted: April 27, 2017; Published online: May 29, 2017Show citation

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ZHAO, L., CHAI, H., WU, H., & ZHU, D. (2017). Mating advantage of short-winged over long-winged adult males in the cricket Velarifictorus ornatus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae). Eur. J. Entomol.114(1), 2017.000. doi: 10.14411/eje.2017.032.
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